Predictions


  • “I think there is a world market for maybe five computers.” — Thomas Watson (1874-1956), Chairman of IBM, 1943
  • “Who the hell wants to hear actors talk?” — H. M. Warner (1881-1958), founder of Warner Brothers, in 1927
  • “Everything that can be invented has been invented.” — Charles H. Duell, Commissioner, U.S. Office of Patents, 1899
  • “There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home.” — Ken Olson, president, chairman and founder of Digital Equipment Corp., 1977
  • “This ‘telephone’ has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us.” — Western Union internal memo, 1876.
  • “The wireless music box has no imaginable commercial value. Who would pay for a message sent to nobody in particular?” — David Sarnoff’s associates in response to his urgings for investment in the radio in the 1920s.
  • “I confess that in 1901, I said to my brother Orville that man would not fly for fifty years . . . Ever since, I have distrusted myself and avoided all predictions.” — Wilbur Wright, 1908
  • Television won’t be able to hold on to any market it captures after the first six months.  People will soon get tired of staring at a plywood box every night.” — Darryl Zanuck, 20th Century Fox.
  • “There’s no chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share.” — Steve Ballmer, Microsoft CEO.
  • “There’s just not that many videos I want to watch.” — Steve Chen, CTO and co-founder of YouTube expressing concern about his company’s long term viability.
  • “Cellular phones will absolutely not replace local wire systems.” — Marty Cooper, inventor.
  • “Remote shopping, while entirely feasible, will flop.” — Time Magazine.